Historical Overview - Administrative Court

Administrative Court (1821-1931)

In 1821, shortly after admission into the Union, the Legislature of Alabama adopted an Act which created and established the earliest form of true "county" government among the several existing counties in the state. The newly formed county government was referred to as the "Administrative Court (of Baldwin County)," which after a period of time became generally referred to as the "Board of Revenue (of Baldwin County)" or "Court of County Commissioners (of Baldwin County)."

At the onset, the "Administrative Court" consisted of four (4) elected "commissioners of roads and revenue," within the several counties, who each served for a period of one year. Commissioners under this form of government (Administrative Court or Board of Revenue or Court of County Commissioners) were vested with authority over the roads and revenue within the county's jurisdictional limits. Such a Board could consider policy when any two commissioners and the judge of the county court were in attendance during regular meetings.

Importantly, during this period, please keep in mind that while the Baldwin County's government operated by the 1821 law establishing the "Administrative Court," they additionally came under the legislative oversight of the applicable provisions set forth in Code of Alabama 1852; Code of Alabama 1867; Code of Alabama 1876; Code of Alabama 1886; Code of Alabama 1896; Code of Alabama 1907, as amended by subsequent Acts & the Code of Alabama 1923, as amended by subsequent Acts.